Conifer Productions

From ideas to apps. From mobile to global.

Learning Clojure

About one year ago I wrote a multi-part tutorial on Clojure programming, describing how I wrote a small utility called ucdump (available on GitHub). Here are links to all the parts: Part 1: The Clojure REPL Part 2: Definitions Part 3: Higher-order functions Part 4: Logic Part 5: Project However, Carin Meier’s Living Clojure is excellent in many ways. Get it from O’Reilly (we’re an affiliate): My little tutorial started with part zero, in which I lamented how functional programming is made to appear unlearnable by mere mortals, and it kind of snowballed from there. Read more →

Functional programming without feeling stupid, part 5: Project

In the last four installments of Functional programming without feeling stupid I’ve slowly built up a small utility called ucdump with Clojure. Experimentiing and developing with the Clojure REPL is fun, but now it’s time to give some structure to the utility. I’ll package it up as a Leiningen project and create a standalone JAR for executing with the Java runtime.

Creating a new project with Leiningen

You can use Leiningen to create a skeleton project quickly. In my project’s root directory, I’ll say:

lein new app ucdump

Leiningen will respond with:

Generating a project called ucdump based on the 'app' template.

The result is a directory called ucdump, which contains:

.gitignore   README.md    project.clj  src/
LICENSE      doc/         resources/   test/

For now I’m are most interested in the project file, project.clj, which is actually a Clojure source file, and the src directory, which is intended for the app’s actual source files.

Leiningen creates a directory called src/ucdump and seeds it with a core.clj file, but that’s not what actually what I want, for two reasons:

  • I want ucdump to be a good Clojure citizen, so I’m going to put it in a namespace

    called com.coniferproductions.ucdump.

  • My Git repository for ucdump also contains the original Python version of the application, which is in <project-root>/python, and I want the Clojure version to live in <<em>project-root</em>>/clojure.

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Functional programming without feeling stupid, part 4: Logic

In the previous parts of “Functional programming without feeling stupid” we have slowly been building ucdump, a utility program for listing the Unicode codepoints and character names of characters in a string. In actual use, the string will be read from a UTF-8 encoded text file.

We don’t know yet how to read a text file in Clojure (well, you may know, but I only have a foggy idea), so we have been working with a single string. This is what we have so far:

(def test-str 
  "Na\u00EFve r\u00E9sum\u00E9s... for 0 \u20AC? Not bad!")
(def test-ch { :offset 0 :character \u20ac })
(def short-test-str "Na\u00EFve")

(defn character-name [x]
  (java.lang.Character/getName (int x)))

(defn character-line [pair]
  (let [ch (:character pair)]
    (format "%08d: U+%06X %s"
      (:offset pair) (int ch)
      (character-name ch))))
    
(defn character-lines [s]
  (let [offsets (repeat (count s) 0)
        pairs (map #(into {} {:offset %1 :character %2}) 
          offsets s)]
    (map character-line pairs)))

I’ve reformatted the code a bit to keep the lines short. You can copy and paste all of that in the Clojure REPL, and start looking at some strings in a new way:

user=> (character-lines "résumé")
("00000000: U+000072 LATIN SMALL LETTER R" 
"00000000: U+0000E9 LATIN SMALL LETTER E WITH ACUTE" 
"00000000: U+000073 LATIN SMALL LETTER S" 
"00000000: U+000075 LATIN SMALL LETTER U" 
"00000000: U+00006D LATIN SMALL LETTER M" 
"00000000: U+0000E9 LATIN SMALL LETTER E WITH ACUTE")

But we are still missing the actual offsets. Let’s fix that now.

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Functional programming without feeling stupid, part 3: Higher-order functions

Welcome to the third installment of “Functional programming without feeling stupid”! I originally started to describe my own learnings about FP in general, and Clojure in particular, and soon found myself writing a kind of Clojure tutorial or introduction. It may not be as comprehensive as others out there, and I still don’t think of it as a tutorial — it’s more like a description of a process, and the documented evolution of a tool.

I wanted to use Clojure “in anger”, and found out that I was learning new and interesting stuff quickly. I wanted to share what I’ve learned in the hope that others may find it useful.

Some of the stuff I have done and described here might not be the most optimal, but I see nothing obviously wrong with my approach. Maybe you do; if that is the case, tell me about it in the comments, or contact me otherwise. But please be nice and constructive, because…

…in Part 0 I wrote about how some people may feel put off by the air of “smarter than thou” that sometimes floats around functional programming. I’m hoping to present the subject in a friendly way, because much of the techniques are not obvious to someone (like me) conditioned with a couple of decades of imperative, object-oriented programming. Not nearly as funny as Learn You a Haskell For Great Good, and not as zany as Clojure for the Brave and True — just friendly, and hopefully lucid.

xkcd 1270: Functional

xkcd 1270: Functional. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial License. This is a company blog, so it is kind of commercial by definition. Is that a problem?

In Part 1 we played around with the Clojure REPL, and in Part 2 we started making definitions and actually got some useful results. In this third part we’re going to take a look at Clojure functions and how to use them, and create our own — because that’s what functional programming is all about.

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Functional programming without feeling stupid, part 2: Definitions

In this installment of “Functional programming without feeling stupid” I would like to show you how to define things in Clojure. Values and function applications are all well and good, but if we can’t give them symbolic names, we need to keep repeating them over and over.

Before we start naming things, let’s have a look at how Clojure integrates with Java. I’m assuming you are still in the REPL, or have started it again with lein repl.

Track 1: “If anyone should ask / We are mated”

As it happens, Clojure’s core library is lean and focused on manipulating the data structures of the language, so many things are deferred to the underlying Java machinery as a rule. For example, mathematical computation is typically done using the static methods in the java.lang.Math class:

user=> (java.lang.Math/sqrt 5.0)
2.23606797749979

As you can see, this is a function application like we have already seen in Part 1, but this time the function we are using is the sqrt static method in the java.lang.Math class.

Java 7 acquired Unicode character names, and they are accessed through

the getName method in the java.lang.Character class. This is no mean feat, since there are over 110,000 characters in the Unicode standard, and each of them has a name (although some of them are algorithmically generated). To find out the canonical character name of a Unicode character, such as the euro currency symbol, you would use the getName static method:

user=> (java.lang.Character/getName \u20ac)
ClassCastException java.lang.Character cannot be cast to java.lang.Number user/eval703 (NO_SOURCE_FILE:1)

Hey, what’s wrong? Well, if you look up the documentation of java.lang.Character.getName, you will find out that it takes an int value as an argument, not a character. You can actually do this check from inside the REPL:

user=> (javadoc java.lang.Character)
true

The REPL doesn’t seem to do much, but you should now have a new web browser window or tab open, with the JavaDoc of the java.lang.Character class loaded up. That’s what the REPL meant when it said

Javadoc: (javadoc java-object-or-class-here)

when it started up. The getName method does need an int value, so let’s try something else:

user=> (java.lang.Character/getName (int \u20ac))
"EURO SIGN"

All right! How about another one:

user=> (java.lang.Character/getName 67)
"LATIN CAPITAL LETTER C"

Well, some say that Clojure is the new C.

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